All posts on March, 2017


April Fools’ 2017 roundup: The pranks start early this year

It is April 1, which means pranks abound all over the interwebs. We here at Computerworld are taking one for the team, doing the hard work of researching the best pranks around so that we can share them with you. It is a thankless job, but somebody’s gotta do it. 

Everyone is getting in on the fun this year — so many that we couldn’t possibly include them all. But the ones that made the cut are sure to make you laugh. 

So pull up a seat and put down your coffee — because if you don’t, you are bound to spray a mouthful all over your computer screen. 

Google Gnome

Google Home has made our homes smart, but our yards have remained decidedly un-smart. No longer — with Google Gnome, your home’s outside can be just as smart as your inside. 

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As March Madness wraps up tonight, security tech is ready

At this weekend’s Final Four college basketball tournament, sophisticated technology is in place to help public safety officials monitor crowds, vehicles, social networks and unauthorized drones from a command center at an undisclosed location in downtown Phoenix.

An array of thousands of cameras and other sensors are already in place across public venues and roadways in the Phoenix area. The games will take take place Saturday night and Monday night at the University of Phoenix Stadium in suburban Glendale, Ariz., nine miles from downtown.

In the stadium alone, more than 700 video cameras are likely to be used to monitor vendors and crowds. Thousands more video cameras and motions sensors are ready to watch vehicles on highways and crowds at 20 Final Four special events, at the four hotels where college teams are lodging and in parking areas.

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Tech to help protect Final Four crowds

At this weekend’s Final Four college basketball tournament, sophisticated technology is in place to help public safety officials monitor crowds, vehicles, social networks and unauthorized drones from a command center at an undisclosed location in downtown Phoenix.

An array of thousands of cameras and other sensors are already in place across public venues and roadways in the Phoenix area. The games will take take place Saturday night and Monday night at the University of Phoenix Stadium in suburban Glendale, Ariz., nine miles from downtown.

In the stadium alone, more than 700 video cameras are likely to be used to monitor vendors and crowds. Thousands more video cameras and motions sensors are ready to watch vehicles on highways and crowds at 20 Final Four special events, at the four hotels where college teams are lodging and in parking areas.

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Google’s Android hacking contest fails to attract exploits

Six months ago, Google offered to pay $200,000 to any researcher who could remotely hack into an Android device by knowing only the victim’s phone number and email address. No one stepped up to the challenge.

While that might sound like good news and a testament to the mobile operating system’s strong security, that’s likely not the reason why the company’s Project Zero Prize contest attracted so little interest. From the start, people pointed out that $200,000 was too low a prize for a remote exploit chain that wouldn’t rely on user interaction.

“If one could do this, the exploit could be sold to other companies or entities for a much higher price,” one user responded to the original contest announcement in September.

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