ECONOMISTS are realising that they have got some things about trade wrong in the past. Just because trade can make everyone better off, doesn’t mean it will, for instance (at least without some help from politicians). That new research, and this year’s political ructions, are generating some reflection on these issues among economists is a good thing. But it is important to maintain one’s perspective. Tim Duy has not done that, I think, in this stemwinder of a post on the effects of American trade policy. He quotes Noah Smith, who says:

[I]n the 1990s and 2000s, the U.S opened its markets to Chinese goods, first with Most Favored Nation trading status, and then by supporting China’s accession to the WTO. The resulting competition from cheap Chinese goods contributed to vast inequality in the United States, reversing many of the employment gains of the 1990s and holding down U.S. wages. But this sacrifice on the part of 90% of the American populace enabled China to lift its…Continue reading