Over the past couple of years, augmented reality (AR) has moved from science fiction into daily life. The most prominent example may be last year's Pokemon Go craze, but the potential uses of overlaying visual data in a real-world environment are showing up in a variety of ways. Microsoft's HoloLens, Google Glass and Apple (with its new plans for AR) all point to the speed with which the technology is advancing.

Although AR has until now been largely aimed at consumer applications and games, it has already shown promise in some business and enterprise settings: Doctors are overlaying clinical data during consultations and surgery; trainings are being offered for a remote audience; field service workers can access data and schematics while away from headquarters; and customers can get remote support to make repairs on their own, guided by an expert.

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